Automation and a possible future for health and social care

As the DF programme winds down, this will be my final blog post. It takes some of the ideas that Sharon Davies and I first shared at the Housing Technology 2018 conference, and applies them to the wider field of social care.

The acquisition of the Dell Boomi integration platform has opened up a vast range of possibilities by allowing us to automate business processes based on things that have happened, or are likely to happen (this is known as event-driven architecture).

Before going into more detail, I am conscious that automation is often seen as a way of getting rid of jobs – anyone familiar with Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano knows how badly that might end, if taken to its logical conclusion! However, if new technology is used to add new capabilities, and to enhance human work (making it more effective and efficient, rather than simply replacing people) – that is where the real benefits of innovation are to be found.

The diagram below (large version here) shows how this could be applied to health and social care in the future.

ASC event driven architecture v0.5 2019-03-24

 

Connected digital health devices (for example, blood pressure monitors) transmit data to an IoT platform (essentially, a data storage area). The integration platform can be programmed with business rules which are triggered by changes in this data. These business rules create actions – these can be things like mobile notifications, health visits, cases and tasks.

A simple health scenario could be:

An elderly citizen takes their blood pressure every morning. The reading is uploaded to the IoT platform. The integration platform picks up the new data and writes it directly to their NHS patient record. As a result, the GP saves time which would otherwise be spent taking blood pressure and doing data entry.

A more complex health scenario could be:

A series of blood pressure readings indicate an increase of 20% in BP over one month. The integration platform notices the pattern and creates an appointment for the resident with a nurse practitioner to carry out further investigations. As a result, the risk of a stroke or heart attack for that citizen is greatly reduced – and of course, the cost of prevention is very much lower than the cost of treating someone with a stroke or a heart attack!

It’s easy to see the potential for savings just from these two examples. The transformation work currently taking place in adult social care at the council should be able to apply these principles to our excellent Carelink Plus service, among other areas, as it replaces older technology with newer, connected health and monitoring devices.

Finally, I just wanted to say that it’s been a pleasure and a privilege to work with such a lovely, talented and motivated group of colleagues, and I wish the council all the best for the (hopefully non-dystopian) future. If you’d like to keep in touch, you can find me on LinkedIn here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new design system at Brighton & Hove City Council

bhcc-patternlibrary

Hi, I’m David Hampton, the User Experience Designer at Digital First. You can call me ‘Design Dave’, as the team do for short.

I joined the team about a year ago. My brief was to build on and improve the online identity of Brighton & Hove City Council, with a focus on designing and documenting standards for re-usable design. We call these ‘web patterns’.

Our overall goal is to provide Brighton & Hove residents with a consistent, friendly and familiar website, whether they need to find and read about a service, report a problem, or browse news.

What we’ve achieved in 2018

Over the past year I’ve been working closely with Product Managers, Content Designers and web developers at Digital First, re-designing and launching website sections.

Improving website accessibility has played a key part. We’re making sure our new design and code is in compliance with accessibility guidelines. This will help improve usability for residents who may access the website in non traditional ways, for example using screen readers.

If you’re a Brighton & Hove resident you may have noticed some of these new designs coming into effect, with some highlights in 2018 being:

How we’ll stick to our own guidelines

I’m excited to share our Website Design Guidelines and Pattern Library. Here you can find references to all new designs and patterns created since January 2018.

At first the pattern library was used internally to communicate new design standards and patterns amongst the team. Today we’re opening it to everyone. We hope this will be a useful resource across departments and teams for referencing new design, and offering solutions to reoccurring design challenges. It may even be useful for other councils and public sector organisations – we’ve built on the experience of others and are delighted to contribute for the greater good.

Our plan is to continually improve the library through ongoing testing and research with actual users. We’ll be including version releases so we can track design progression.

bhcc-pattern-example
Above: An example website pattern with usage notes.

Over the coming weeks I will be blogging in more detail about some of the new designs and pattern library features. If you have any questions, please post below or get in touch.

User research towards a new Newsroom

A screenshot of the old Newsroom page.
How the old Newsroom looked

Hi, my name is Lorna. In June 2018, I was asked to lead on the redesign of the newsroom for Brighton & Hove City Council’s new website. The redesign would form part of the work the Communications team is doing to update our style for a more modern approach to news, such as writing for the web and social media.

The new website

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you will know that our new website has been live for a while. We’re rolling it out slowly, as we redesign the content with each council team and move sections over from the old site.

As such, we already had an information architecture and pattern library for most of the website content. However, news content works differently to static or transaction-focused content as it entails different goals (for both residents and the council). News content needs to engage and entertain rather than just inform people, and can have a shorter shelf-life.  So, we needed to do some thorough user research to uncover the users’ needs and behaviours before attempting to redesign the newsroom.

Planning the research

We decided that our primary target users were local residents and the communications officers who write our news articles and post them online.

I put together a research plan that included:

Some images of heatmaps of the Newsroom.
One source of data I used was heatmaps that show where people click and scroll when reading stories
  • a pop-up survey of readers of council news stories
  • interviews with local residents
  • comparative analysis of other council websites and news sites
  • analysis of visitor traffic to the existing newsroom
  • analysis of social media engagement
  • analysis of heatmaps of visitor behaviour on the existing newsroom
  • interviews with news authors

Addressing limitations and avoiding bias in research

A photograph of the inside of the Bartholomew House Customer Service Centre.
I interviewed 31 residents in different council customer service centres and libraries

As with all research, it was important to be aware of the limitations and the potential biases that were difficult to avoid using these methods. For example, the interviews were held with people I approached in libraries and customer service centres, so there were some groups of people that I was more likely to speak to than others. Also, because the survey was aimed at people visiting the news pages, the responses were from people already engaged with the news pages.

However, the findings of the survey and interviews were interesting and seemed to be supported by the available online data.

Challenges

As with all projects, this one had its challenges! For example, we had initially included businesses as another target audience. However, I found it was very time consuming to engage with businesses and we want to make sure we have the time to properly work with them. So, we put a hold on that angle of the project for the time-being, but we will definitely talk to businesses again in the future.

While we did end up with a reasonable number of responses to the online survey on our news stories, this also took quite some time before there were sufficient responses for us to draw conclusions from it. We also had to be careful that we weren’t receiving multiple responses from the same user. Although the survey software seemed designed to prevent multiple responses, I certainly found some responses that seemed suspiciously similar!

One other challenge was that respondents were using the survey as a way to communicate with the council, instead of using our customer services contact forms. As we didn’t insist on respondents leaving an email address, we often had no way of getting back to them about an issue they had raised. We also had to be judicious about whether/how the data was used to inform the newsroom design.

Key findings and their implications for the design

Some of the findings that influenced the strategic decisions we made included:

An example of a sketched design and the resulting design pattern that is used on the new Newsroom.
I sketched different designs and worked with our designer to create solutions that fit within the new website design guidelines

Finding: People don’t tend to visit the council website to “browse” for general news. They are very often visiting to find information about a specific story they have heard about elsewhere.

Solution: Prioritise search functionality and categorise news stories to help visitors find the information they have come for.

Finding: Stories about major building developments and related consultations are far more popular than any other topic.

Solution: Clearly link to the Major Developments section of the website, and review how that content is presented when it is moved to the new website.

Finding: Word-of-mouth is a very important source of local news (including social media). However, people often repeated misinformation or had misinterpreted information.

Solution: Use callouts or pull quotes to flag the most important pieces of information so that people get the correct facts if they don’t read the whole story and remember the things that are most important.

Finding: Although many residents are on social media and they are not surprised that the council has social media accounts, it hadn’t occurred to them to follow the council. The same was true for our email newsletters. Some respondents said they would follow us or subscribe (if it looked interesting) but that they hadn’t thought about it.

Solution: Make links to subscribe to our email newsletter and follow our social media accounts more prominent.

Launching the Newsroom and plans for the future

A screenshot of how the Newsroom looked on the day we launched it
What the Newsroom looks like now

The new Newsroom was launched on 10 December 2018, as a “minimum viable product”. This means that some of the features described above are not included yet, but we are continuing development behind the scenes. I am also carrying out evaluation of this first version (including research with users of course!). We plan to launch the next version in the spring.